Archive for the ‘history’ Category

February 4, 2009

Saturday January 31, 2009 Much warmer today — it got above 40F.

***Found myself thinking about 1,000 books to read after you die. (And, later, 1,000 places to see after you die.) Which is evidence that my mind is working normally again.

***Bought at Steeple People thrift store: Daniel Nagrin, How to Dance Forever. Most modern dancers are out of the game at forty. Nagrin was dancing at least into his late sixties. Arthur Schlesinger Jr., The Cycles of American History. Including the conservative-liberal political cycle. The conservative Republicans who thought the Bush Presidency had made them a permanent political majority were wrong. The liberal Democrats now talking about being a permanent majority are also in for unpleasant surprises. Went to the Wedge Co-op. On my way back, stopped in at DreamHaven Books.

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Sunday February 1, 2009 Dreamed about a medical problem: When a woman is pregnant with twins, she provides milk to both wombs. If she later becomes pregnant with a single child, the pattern has already been established. Milk is provided to both wombs, and half of it is wasted.

***”China, US shout to be heard in dialogue of the deaf”

My subconscious commented “With sign language interpretation for the blind.”

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Monday February 2, 2009 For the first time, I made French toast using soy milk. Turned out reasonably well. The soy milk was vanilla-flavored; I would have liked a stronger vanilla flavor.

***Self-quoting from a thread on rec.arts.sf.composition: Secrets could also be about things not done rather than done.

“I’ve never really killed anyone.”

Or “When I became a priest, I didn’t believe in the Scavenger Gods.”

“So? Everybody knows the Temple only certifies priests who don’t believe.”

“Yes, but now I DO believe.”

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Tuesday February 3, 2009 At Savers thrift store, found a good winter jacket. Bought it to replace the sorta-okay one I’d been wearing. Momentary thought: Nothing wrong with the old one which couldn’t be fixed. The torn pocket could be repaired with duct tape. I put on the new jacket before leaving the store. And realized there was indeep something unrepairable wrong with the old jacket. It was too tight across the chest and shoulders. (It hadn’t been when I’d bought it.) On to Aldi supermarket. Then to Target, mostly for canned computer-dusting gas.

January 16, 2009

Thursday January 14, 2009 “Leda glanced down smiled and beckoned me forward with an imperious red-tipped finger. I pulled back from the hot tongue on my tentacles and stepped around her.”

***From the LiveJournal online_books feed: Book for Receipts http://spec.lib.vt.edu/mss/pdf/CUBG.pdf Book for Receipts (manuscript, cover dated 1731) (PDF at vt.edu)

December 18, 2008

Wednesday December 17, 2008

Public release date: 17-Dec-2008

Contact: Rachael Davies
rdavies@bma.org.uk
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal
Should the Pope be worried that Wales won the rugby Grand Slam this year?
Research paper: Rugby (the religion of Wales) and its influence on the Catholic Church: Should Pope Benedict XVI be worried?

Doctors in the Christmas issue published on bmj.com today are urging the Vatican’s medical team to keep a special watch over the Pope this Christmas, after their research investigating the link between papal deaths and Welsh rugby performance suggests that he has about a 45% chance of dying by the end of 2008.

Dr Gareth Payne and his team from Cardiff found no evidence to support the urban legend that “every time Wales win the rugby Grand Slam, a Pope dies”, but they did find limited data linking Welsh rugby performance and papal deaths. Worryingly for Pope Benedict XVI, Wales won the Grand Slam in 2008.

The researchers charted all northern hemisphere rugby championships since 1883, but discarded the years 1885, 1888-9, 1897-8 and 1972 because not all the scheduled matches were played. For the purposes of their research, a Grand Slam was defined as one nation beating all other competing teams.

Since 1883, eight Pontiffs have died, five in Grand Slam years—three deaths happened when Wales completed the sweep, and two others occurred when Wales won the tournament but not the Grand Slam.

Interestingly, say the authors, although the deaths did not always coincide with a Welsh Grand Slam win, they did correspond with a victory of a predominantly Protestant nation (England, Scotland or Wales), rather than a Roman Catholic nation (France, Ireland, or Italy).

The authors comment that the link between Popes and Grand Slams “is nothing more than an urban myth…This comes as something of a relief as we are at a loss to see how the events could be linked, especially given the continuing rapprochement between Catholic and Protestant churches.”

However, given that the research suggests a link between the success of the Welsh rugby union team and papal deaths, the authors believe that the Vatican medical staff “can’t fully relax until the new year arrives”.

November 30, 2008

Saturday November 29, 2008  Farther ahead on “The Day They Took Port Sharehold.”  A simple tale of a bureaucrat doing his job — which happens to involve dealing with starships named after female pirates.

***”What are your favorite things to cook when you really don’t feel like cooking or spending a lot of time in the kitchen – those quick, easy, go-to meals when you’re in recovery from preparing a feast?”
http://community.livejournal.com/cooking/7099000.html

Recipes in comments so far are all beyond what many people would consider easy.

***http://thenostalgialeague.com/
“B-Movies, Serials, Old Time Radio, Westerns, Comics, Railroads (real and model), Collecting…we are interested in all of them. There’s even room for other memories too.”

Caution:  Might make you feel old.  For example, there’s a Battlestar Galactica article.

***’Historically, European cuisine had promoted the pseudomedical belief that particular seasonings and modes of preparation could — and should — eliminate imbalances in the human constitution. In the middle of the 17th century, however, leading French gastronomes let go of this idea and undertook the refinement of flavor for its own sake. Butter and cream sauces, whose value was gustatory (enhancing the taste of underlying ingredients) as opposed to medicinal (recalibrating the body’s four “humors,” as set forth by Hippocratic physicians), thus came to the fore, and an elegant, toothsome new brand of cooking was born.’
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/30/books/review/Weber-t.html?ref=books (register, or go through http://www.bugmenot.com/)