Science, with some political implications

From eurkalert.org:

Public Release: 27-May-2008
Geology
June 2008 Geology and GSA Today media highlights
GEOLOGY topics include Samoa on the hotspot trail, South Carolina’s offshore iceberg scours; Yellowstone’s climate-induced geyser periodicity; coralline red algae as a high-resolution climate recorder; the effects of extreme storm events on landscape and carbon dioxide; the iron isotope record and the first emergence of atmospheric and oceanic oxygen; and eastern California’s shear zone earthquakes. GSA Today’s science article discusses the Canadian Shield, Earth’s oldest continental crust, where rocks may have originated under primordial seas.
http://www.geosociety.org/news/pr/08-23.htm

Public Release: 27-May-2008
Scripta Materialia
NC State breakthrough results in super-hard nanocrystalline iron that can take the heat
Researchers at North Carolina State University have created a substance far stronger and harder than conventional iron, and which retains these properties under extremely high temperatures — opening the door to a wide variety of potential applications, such as engine components that are exposed to high stress and high temperatures.
National Science Foundation
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-05/ncsu-nsb052708.php

Public Release: 27-May-2008
Molecular Systems Biology
Weizmann Institute scientists build a better DNA molecule
Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science demonstrate that a mathematical concept called recursion can be applied to constructing flawless synthetic DNA molecules. The ideal molecules are created in successive rounds in which faultless segments are lifted from longer, error-containing DNA strands and assembled anew.
http://wis-wander.weizmann.ac.il/site/en/weizman.asp?pi=371&doc_id=5130

Public Release: 27-May-2008
JAMA
Prevalence of obesity among US children and teens does not increase
There was no significant increase in the prevalence of obese children and teens in the US between 1999 and 2006, in contrast to the increase that had been reported in prior years, according to a study in the May 28 issue of JAMA.
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-05/jaaj-poo052208.php

Public Release: 25-May-2008
Research suggests parts of UK could be too hot for wine making by 2080
Increasing summer temperatures could mean some parts of southern England are too hot to grow vines for making wine by 2080, according to a new book launched today.
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-05/icl-rsp052308.php
“The author, Emeritus Professor Richard Selley from Imperial College London, claims that if average summer temperatures in the UK continue to rise as predicted, the Thames Valley, parts of Hampshire and the Severn valley, which currently contain many vineyards, will be too hot to support wine production within the next 75 years.

“Instead, Professor Selley says, this land could be suitable for growing raisins, currents and sultanas, currently only cultivated in hot climates such as North Africa and the Middle East.”

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